Sex, sexualities and seduction: reflections on relational dynamics and negotiations in ethnographic field work by Femke Brandt and Jenny Josefsson

The African Gender Institute invites you to a seminar: Sex, sexualities and seduction: reflections on relational dynamics and negotiations in ethnographic field work by Femke Brandt and Jenny Josefsson. 

Femke Brandt is a post-doctoral fellow at the Centre for African Studies in the NRF Research Chair on Land Reform and Democracy in South Africa. She obtained her PhD degree at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in the Netherlands. Her ethnography is about relational dynamics between farmers and farm workers on Karoo trophy-hunting farms. Her research interests are power and belonging in the commercial farming landscape in the context of farm conversions to private game farms. Moreover, Femke is interested in exploring dynamics of doing ethnographic field work and the process of knowledge generation, in particular questions of ethics, reflexivity, positionality, power, and interpretation. In this seminar Femke and Jenny share and reflect on their experiences in establishing research relations in the commercial farming landscape focussing on the way seduction and sexuality shaped both their experiences and research processes.  

Jenny Josefsson is currently doing her PhD in Geography at the University of the Free State (RSA) and the VU University (NL). Her research focuses on the trend to convert cattle farms into game farms in KwaZulu-Natal, and the impacts the conversions have on farm dwellers. Of particular interest to her are the relationships between people on the farms, people, land and landscapes, as well as people and wildlife. Her interest in the sometimes challenging dynamics of ethnographic field work was born out of her own field work experiences - both good and anxiety-ridden. This interest and knowledge then further grew, in both width and depth, through conversations with her colleague and friend Femke Brandt. Further to this, her research interests lie in the tensions between conservation and development and constructs of nature and society, and how such notions are transformed into policy and practice. Jenny, being Swedish, first came to South Africa in 2006 as an exchange student at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, and in 2008 she moved to Cape Town where she worked in environmental education, biodiversity communication, and adaptation to climate change before commencing her doctoral studies.

 

 

Location

AXL Seminar Room 4.01 (Level 4, Harry Oppenheimer Building, UCT)